Facts, factoids and factlets

5 12 2016

When someone says “Did you know…” or “You’ll never guess what I learned today…” they are probably about to share a factoid with you. Or are they?

Well you’ll never guess what I learned today – it turns out factoids are not notable facts worth sharing. Despite what Steve Wright (in the afternoon) might have you believe factoids are not true facts at all. Factoids are pieces of untrue information that sound credible enough that a significant number of us believe them and share them even though they are actually nonsense. REF

A typical factoid might be that the Great Wall of China can be seen from space. It can’t. It might be very long but it’s never wide enough to be resolved without a powerful telescope. 


Another is that the thicker glass found at the bottom of old cathedral windows proves that glass is a liquid and flows. It doesn’t. If it did our museums would be filled old glass vessels that would all look saggy at the bottom and they aren’t. 


It is a FACT that liquids flow. There are no strong forces holding their molecules together. Their molecules can move freely past one another. That is why liquids can be poured, splashed around, and spilled.

It is a FACT that, like in a liquid, the atoms in glass are not arranged in any regular order. 

But it is also a FACT that, unlike in a liquid, the atoms in glass are all held together tightly by strong chemical bonds. Despite not sitting in a regular order they cannot move freely past each other. This is what makes glass rigid. It cannot flow at room temperature. 

So it is a FACTIOD to say glass flows like a liquid. It is wrong. 

But it is a FACTLET to say that old pieces of glass are not uniformly thick. Due to their production process some sections were thicker than others and it makes sense to put the thicker, stronger sections at the bottom. 

Now I know about the confusion in these terms I will henceforth refer to pieces of information with clear and accepted evidence FACTS. To pieces of oft repeated but untrue information as FACTOIDS. And to those undoubtably true and irresistible pieces of highly shareable information we should all include in our presentations as FACTLETS.

Did you know that it is a FACT that viscosity (the opposite of fluidity) is measured in poises?

It is a FACT that at room temperature, the viscosity of water is about 0.01 poise. Molasses has a viscosity of about 500 poises.

 

It is also a FACT that estimates of the viscosity of glass at room temperature run as high as  100,000,000,000,000,000,000 (10 to the 20th power) poises. LINK

I’ll leave you with one last FACT. The viscosity of metallic lead has been estimated to be about 100,000,000,000 (10 to the 11th power) poises. 

So the next time you find yourself in an old cathedral and someone tells you the incorrect FACTOID about the flowing glass you can hit right back with the entirely correct FACTLET that

the lead holding in the panes of glass is actually a billion times less viscous than the glass!

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