Potpourri revisited

7 03 2016

A while back I wrote about what I like to call Potpourri Shows. A potpourri is an assembly of dried flowers and spices that smells good but it also refers to

  
a mixture or medley of things

Now that sounds good. We could maybe write a science show that was a selection, an assemblage, a melange even a miscellany of demos and concepts?

But hang on. Maybe if we did that our show could end up as more of a ragbaga hotchpotch and a mishmash than an attractive smorgasbord.

And as our job is to enlighten and inspire we certainly wouldn’t want to put on a jumble or, heaven forbid, a farrago

These last few weeks I’ve had the pleasure of seeing no less than four very competent performers present shows that fell well short of the standards they should and could be achieving because their chosen show titles were little more than potpourri camouflage.

You should be able to describe the story, the theme, the big underlying idea of your presentation in a single sentance. A potpourri show by definition will fail this test because by its very nature as it jumps from unrelated demo to unrelated demo it brings in far too many competing concepts. (However carefully its real nature has been disguised with a clever title that gives the impression of a theme like “Science Magic!” or “Chemical Chaos!”).

If you won’t take this advice on my say this is what Lawrence Bragg of the Royal Institution has to say on the matter:

How many main points can we hope to ‘get over’ in an hour? I think the answer should be one. If the average member of the audience can remember with interest and enthusiasm one main theme, the lecture has been a great success. 

  

Sir Lawrence Bragg (1891-1971) winner of a Nobel Prize at 25, Cavendish Professor of Experimental Physics at Cambridge and, most importantly in this context, Resident Professor at the Royal Institution for 13 years and the founder of the weekly ‘Schools Lectures’ for children. 

If just one main point was good enough for the man who presented his lectures to an estimated 100,000 children over the years at the RI then it should be good enough for us as well. 

Ditch the potpourri shows, find a compelling story to tell and take the time to tell that one story so we go away feeling your enthusiasm and excitement. 

  
It is all to easy to set out to make a delicious olla podrida but end up instead with a right gallimaufry. And no one wants that. 

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